Category Archives: Biblical Theology

baptism as a potential sacrament finds middle ground between three views of baptism

Baptism: A Potential Sacrament

The doctrine and practice of baptism is one of the cornerstones of Christian ecclesiology. In the Great Commission, Jesus tells his church to make disciples, baptizing them in the name of the Triune God (Matt. 28:19). Jesus could have prescribed any number of things in his final charge to his disciples, but He included baptism. This places baptism high on the Christian’s priority list. Despite its significance, the church at large has not come to an agreement on what precisely baptism is and how precisely we are to perform it.

“What is baptism?”
“What are the key differences between major denominations in their views of baptism?”
“Is there a possibility of denominations coming together in agreement on this doctrine?”

Such questions are at the heart of this study. I wish to navigate between three different positions on baptism (Memorial Sign, Regenerative Sacrament, and Covenantal Sacrament), and show how baptism is both a sign and sacrament.  Continue reading Baptism: A Potential Sacrament

He rescues us from this present age

Jesus Delivered Himself to Deliver Us (Galatians 1:4)

“[Jesus] gave Himself for our sins so that He might rescue us from this present evil age according to the will of God our Father.”

The statement is at the introduction of Paul’s letter and seems to simply be an outburst of doxology. He is overwhelmed at the tremendous mercy of Christ. However, from verse 6 of this chapter we can glean that Paul is not merely rejoicing in this faith. Rather, he is strategically stating the true gospel right out of the gate. You see, the very next thing Paul mentions after this work of Christ is that the Galatians are falling into a different gospel. Thus his statement in verse 4 is that real, saving gospel from which the Galatians are deviating. They had lost focus of the cross. Continue reading Jesus Delivered Himself to Deliver Us (Galatians 1:4)

A Christian does not need to keep the Sabbath

A Christian and Sabbath Observance: Why You Don’t Need to Rest on Sundays, or Saturdays

In a recent post on the Bible’s perspective of the Sabbath we learned that the Fulfilled Sabbath position is, in all likelihood, the most accurate in representing the biblical teaching of Sabbath. Below, I will list a few reasons as to why I believe this is so, and why the Eternal Sabbath (Seventh Day Adventist) and the Christian Sabbath (Reformed) do not line up with Scripture. Continue reading A Christian and Sabbath Observance: Why You Don’t Need to Rest on Sundays, or Saturdays

A Biblical view of the Sabbath is that Christians don't need to keep the Sabbath

A Biblical Perspective on the Sabbath

From a biblical perspective, the Sabbath day in its entirety is identified as being fulfilled in Christ and is therefore transformed to be the rest which Christ will give in the new heavens and new earth. Christ came to fulfill the Law, and in doing so superseded—or rather transformed—it into the Law of Christ. In the Law of Christ, the Sabbath command is never repeated nor commanded to be observed, and therefore is no longer binding upon Christians as a weekly observance. Rather, it becomes the rest promised by Christ in the new heavens and earth. It is the eternal rest or salvation which God entered into in Genesis 2 and which Christ offers those who have faith in him. Continue reading A Biblical Perspective on the Sabbath

Revelation 3:10 does not actually support the pre-trib rapture

Why Revelation 3:10 Does Not Support the Pre-Trib Rapture

For some, Revelation 3:10 is something of a silver bullet when it comes to proving that the rapture (the taking up of the Church to heaven) will occur before the 7 years of tribulation prophesied to come upon the earth. It reads,

Because you have kept my word about patient endurance, I will keep you from the hour of trial that is coming on the whole world, to try those who dwell on the earth.” Continue reading Why Revelation 3:10 Does Not Support the Pre-Trib Rapture

The traditional doctrine of justification is all about the courtroom

The Traditional Doctrine of Justification: Putting Together the Pieces of the Puzzle

All who believe in Jesus Christ are justified before God. But what does that mean? The traditional doctrine of justification can be summarized: “Believers are declared to be righteous before God based on the imputation of Christ’s active obedience.”

Now, if you are searching for what verse says that, you won’t find it. There is no single verse that spells out every detail of this great doctrine. However, that does not mean it is absent altogether. In Brian Vicker’s excellent book, Jesus’ Blood and Righteousness: Paul’s Theology of Imputation, he admits that no one passage includes every piece of the puzzle. He states however, that when we synthesize each of the major texts on the subject, as well as take into consideration broad biblical-theological themes, we see that the traditional doctrine is taught. Continue reading The Traditional Doctrine of Justification: Putting Together the Pieces of the Puzzle